According to a new report, Chrome will be rolling out tools which allow users to block all tracking cookies. However, there’s a catch — these soon-to-be-released tools will not allow users to block tracking cookies from Google.

As browsers look to better compete with Google Chrome through new privacy features, the tech giant is now rolling out its own tools.

Track These Cookies

According to reports, Chrome will soon have a tool to block all tracking cookies. The tool, however, will not affect Google’s own scripts and cookies. The option is likely a compromise from a company which has been feeling pressure in the wake of the Cambridge Analytica and Facebook scandal fallout back in 2017.

With Facebook repeatedly coming under fire for neglecting privacy, Google wants to stay out of the controversy. It has allegedly been mulling over the Chrome tool for more than six years now. It plans to release the tool sometime in the
‘near future.’

As mentioned in the Wall Street Journal, the update will give Google a major advantage over its rivals among internet browsers and advertisers. Rather than collecting data directly through tracking cookies, advertisers may now have to pass through Google to better calibrate their ad reach.

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However, the fact that the new tool won’t block Google’s own tracking cookies should make one skeptical. Google is effectively trying to have their cake and eat it too. If Google was actually interested in benefiting its users, it would have blocked all tracking cookies. Instead, it’s clear Google is only rolling out this update for good PR and to further choke out its competitors.

Overall, it’s a lackluster compromise that may not go well when officially released.

Why Chrome When You Can Brave?

Chrome’s anti-tracking tool may be disappointing, but luckily it’s not even needed. There are better options out right now, so  there’s no need to wait for the new Chrome tool.

In the past year, the Brave Browser has been gaining popularity because it blocks all trackers, pop-ups, and other malicious scripts. Many users have praised the platform for having some of the best privacy protections out of any browser available. It even has built-in Tor if you want to go fully anonymous.

The Brave browser is closely tied to Basic Attention Token (BAT), the currency for an ecosystem built into the Brave browsing experience. You can opt to disable all ads or you can allow ads and earn BAT. The end result is a user experience that lets you choose when you want to see ads, putting the user in the driver’s seat.

Although Chrome may be rolling out anti-tracking protections, it may be too little too late. Brave has already beaten them to the punch, and the loopholes in Chrome’s tool will likely cause a justified backlash.

Do you believe Brave can someday compete with Chrome? Let us know your thoughts in the comments below.